Certified Arborist Tree Trimming Dallas
 
Given the time of year, its a good time to discuss mistletoe and its relationship with trees.  Although, as a Christmas ornament, mistletoe has been known to attract kisses, in the world of trees, the parasitic plant is not as highly regarded.

That's right, I said "parasitic."  For purpose of discussion, parasites are defined as organisms that depend on the existence of a host organism without providing any benefit to the host.  Often, the parasite exists at the host's "expense." 

Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant that embeds into the wood of host trees.  In the Dallas/Fort Worth area, typical host trees include Cedar Elm, Hackberry, Bois d'Arc, and Red Oak.  Mistletoe, gets its water and nutrients through small "roots" that penetrate the sapwood of host trees.  In winter, these appear as green clumps within the bare canopy of deciduous trees.  Mature mistletoe grows attractive white berries that are attractive to birds.  As birds eat and excrete the seeds, any that land on a host tree limb will sprout and begin the parasitic relationship with the host.

Mistletoe typically will not alone kill a tree but heavy infestations will terribly distress trees to the point where they succumb to other problems or lack the vigor found in non-infested trees.  I once removed a large Cedar Elm that had all but died from an infestation that was so heavy the tree resembled an evergreen Live Oak with almost full winter foliage.  Due to the infestation, the tree had no annual growth or vigor and developed grotesque burls or growths in the infested wood.

Currently, there is no reliable chemical control of this plant although there is research looking to create one. Mistletoe can be eliminated or controlled by pruning. Removing the plant or branches where the plant is attached will prevent them from maturing and propogating additional sites in the tree.  This will eliminate or minimize the impact of mistletoe on your trees.

Have Heriage Tree Service of Texas help you get control of the mistloe in your trees.  Call us for a free estimate.   
1/24/2019 12:39:56 pm

This was a most informative post you have shared on this page about the spring in the air because it’s time to kick-off the much awaited spring season! The Southern Spring Home & Garden Show is celebrating 56 years showcasing the best of what Charlotte has to offer, and Carolina Tree Care is proud to be an exhibitor. Come out for a great event and learn about our tree trimming, tree removal, and plant health care services– CTC will be located at Booth # 2804. We can’t wait to meet with you and discuss your tree care needs.
Thanks.

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9/24/2019 03:13:40 am

Mistletoe typically will not alone kill a tree but heavy infestations will terribly distress trees to the point where they succumb to other problems or lack the vigor found in non-infested trees. I once removed a large Cedar Elm that had all but died from an infestation that was so heavy the tree resembled an evergreen Live Oak with almost full winter foliage. Due to the infestation, the tree had no annual growth or vigor and developed grotesque burls or growths in the infested wood.

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9/25/2019 08:03:05 am

This was a most informative post you have shared on this page about the spring in the air because it’s time to kick-off the much awaited spring season! The Southern Spring Home & Garden Show is celebrating 56 years showcasing the best of what Charlotte has to offer, and Carolina Tree Care is proud to be an exhibitor. Come out for a great event and learn about our tree trimming, tree removal, and plant health care services– CTC will be located at Booth # 2804. We can’t wait to meet with you and discuss your tree care needs.
Thanks.

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10/3/2019 11:54:52 am

Pole pruners are used to cut branches beyond reach. They are basically lopping shears on a long handle. Once again, the by-pass style is preferred. They should not be used near utility lines, except by qualified personnel, because of the risk of electrocution. For branches larger than 4
Clean, sharp implements make pruning easier.

Clean, sharp implements make pruning easier.

inches in diameter, chain saws are preferred, but they should only be used by qualified individuals

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11/7/2019 12:23:47 pm

If you find any diseased areas, cut them off at least six inches back from where the infection ends, and at a healthy lateral branch. This is important: Lysol your tools after every pruning cut in an infected tree. This will stop the problem from spreading to otherwise healthy parts of the tree

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11/7/2019 03:20:45 pm

I once removed a large Cedar Elm that had all but died from an infestation that was so heavy the tree resembled an evergreen Live Oak with almost full winter foliage. Due to the infestation, the tree had no annual growth or vigor and developed grotesque burls or growths in the infested wood

Reply
11/8/2019 04:56:56 am

parasites are defined as organisms that depend on the existence of a host organism without providing any benefit to the host. Often, the parasite exists at the host's "expense.
Thanks

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11/30/2019 07:35:44 am

It's true that when it comes to proper tree removal, most homeowners don't know how to properly do it, that's why it's best to look for professional tree services. I like it when you pointed out the advantages of hiring one. My dad is planning to cut the trees in our old property, I will advise him to look for professional tree services for proper guidance

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12/6/2019 04:35:11 am

these appear as green clumps within the bare canopy of deciduous trees. Mature mistletoe grows attractive white berries that are attractive to birds. As birds eat and excrete the seeds, any that land on a host tree limb will sprout and begin the parasitic relationship with the host.
Thanks

Reply
12/6/2019 11:31:40 pm

Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant that embeds into the wood of host trees. In the Dallas/Fort Worth area, typical host trees include Cedar Elm, Hackberry, Bois d'Arc, and Red Oak. Mistletoe, gets its water and nutrients through small "roots" that penetrate the sapwood of host trees. In winter, these appear as green clumps within the bare canopy of deciduous trees. Mature mistletoe grows attractive white berries that are attractive to birds. As birds eat and excrete the seeds, any that land on a host tree limb will sprout and begin the parasitic relationship with the host

Reply
12/6/2019 11:41:30 pm

Mistletoe typically will not alone kill a tree but heavy infestations will terribly distress trees to the point where they succumb to other problems or lack the vigor found in non-infested trees. I once removed a large Cedar Elm that had all but died from an infestation that was so heavy the tree resembled an evergreen Live Oak with almost full winter foliage. Due to the infestation, the tree had no annual growth or vigor and developed grotesque burls or growths in the infested wood

Reply
3/16/2020 06:40:05 pm

Mistletoe typically will not alone kill a tree but heavy infestations will terribly distress trees to the point where they succumb to other problems or lack the vigor found in non-infested trees. I once removed a large Cedar Elm that had all but died from an infestation that was so heavy the tree resembled an evergreen Live Oak with almost full winter foliage. Due to the infestation, the tree had no annual growth or vigor and developed grotesque burls or growths in the infested wood.

Reply
3/28/2020 04:00:31 pm

Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant that embeds into the wood of host trees. In the Dallas/Fort Worth area, typical host trees include Cedar Elm, Hackberry, Bois d'Arc, and Red Oak. Mistletoe, gets its water and nutrients through small "roots" that penetrate the sapwood of host trees. In winter, these appear as green clumps within the bare canopy of deciduous trees. Mature mistletoe grows attractive white berries that are attractive to birds. As birds eat and excrete the seeds, any that land on a host tree limb will sprout and begin the parasitic relationship with the host.
Thanks

Reply
3/28/2020 04:01:46 pm

That's right, I said "parasitic." For purpose of discussion, parasites are defined as organisms that depend on the existence of a host organism without providing any benefit to the host. Often, the parasite exists at the host's "expense."
Thanks

Reply
4/27/2020 09:43:47 am

Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant that embeds into the wood of host trees. In the Dallas/Fort Worth area, typical host trees include Cedar Elm, Hackberry, Bois d'Arc, and Red Oak. Mistletoe, gets its water and nutrients through small "roots" that penetrate the sapwood of host trees. In winter, these appear as green clumps within the bare canopy of deciduous trees. Mature mistletoe grows attractive white berries that are attractive to birds. As birds eat and excrete the seeds, any that land on a host tree limb will sprout and begin the parasitic relationship with the host.
Thanks

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